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Pension input periods.

What is a pension input period?

A pension input period is used by Her Majesty's Revenue & Customs (HMRC) to determine which tax year your contributions are treated for tax purposes.

The annual allowance for a tax year is tested against pension savings made during the pension input period ending in that tax year.

Legal & General pension input periods

The scheme pension input period for the following pension plans is 6 April to 5 April and has run from 6 April 2006.

  • Legal & General Personal Pension Scheme Number 1
  • Legal & General Self Invested Person Pension
  • Legal & General Portfolio Plus Self Invested Personal Pension
  • Legal & General Personal Pension 2000
  • Legal & General Stakeholder Pension
  • Legal & General Stakeholder Pension Established in 2008
  • Legal & General Pensions Savings Plan
  • Legal & General (UTM) Stakeholder Pension Scheme
  • Legal & General Group Personal Pension Scheme Number 1
  • Legal & General Group Self Invested Personal Pension
  • Legal & General Group Portfolio Plus Self Invested Personal Pension
  • Legal & General Group Personal Pension 2000
  • Legal & General Group Stakeholder Pension
  • Legal & General WorkSave Pension Plan

If you are a member of a Legal & General pension scheme that is not listed above, the scheme PIP will have been set by the scheme trustee, not us - please contact your employer if you require this information.

If you have pension plans with other providers, you could have a different pension input period for each scheme that you are a member of.

What is the annual allowance?

The Annual Allowance for most people for the tax year 2016/2017 is £40,000 unless you have a reduced annual allowance (£10,000) based on having taken a cash lump sum or Flexi-Access Drawdown direct from your pension pot since 6 April 2015. For those with earnings over £110,000 a year, and £150,000 a year when total pension contributions are included, the annual allowance may reduce below £40,000 but not less than £10,000.

Your Annual Allowance takes into account gross contributions paid by you and any contributions paid by your employer or third parties to any registered pension scheme. Contributions received as a result of contracting out of the State Second Pension and transfer payments are not counted for the purpose of the annual allowance test.

If the total contributions to all of your pensions add up to more than the Annual Allowance, you will have to pay a tax charge on the amount paid above the Annual Allowance.

The Annual Allowance will not apply in the tax year in which you die or if you take your benefits on the grounds of serious ill health.

Where the total of the contributions to all of your registered pension schemes exceeds the annual allowance in a given year, unused allowances from up to three previous tax years may be available. The annual allowance for 2015/2016 and 2014/2015 is assumed to be £40,000 for this purpose and £50,000 for year prior to that. If you have taken a cash lump sum or Flexi-Access Drawdown direct from your pension pot since 6 April 2015 you can’t top it up with unused allowance from previous years.

To be able to do this you must have been a member of a registered pension scheme in the tax year(s) from which you wish to make use of any unused allowance. If you think this may affect you please contact your financial adviser.

USING TAX YEAR FOR YOUR TAX RETURN

I have been using the tax year from my tax return, what should I do?

As the pension input period is based on the tax year, you don't need to do anything.

What if I have previously nominated a pension input period?

Your personally selected pension input period will be used.

ANNIVERSARY oF FIRST CONTRIBUTION FOLLOWING APRIL 6 2006

I have been using the anniversary of my first contribution following 6 April 2006 for my tax return, what should I do?

You'll be liable for any Annual Allowance charge that arises as a result of the change in the pension input period. You'll be able to claim any repayment of any overpayment that may arise as a result of the change. A repayment claim can be made up to six years after the end of the tax year in which the overpayment was made.

More information can be found on the HM Revenue & Customs pensions website.

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